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    sweetsurrender68:

    Amalfi-Positano coast, Italy By rohaberl


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    “The people of the Book [i.e., Jews and Christians] have achieved supremacy
    over us in medicine.”


    As jurisprudence developed, there arose a tension between those advocating the total acceptance of doctrines laid down by a particular school of law, called the principle of taqlid, and those who allowed the possibility of independent reasoning (ijtihad). Yet in none of the early writings on jurisprudence or in the collections of hadiths does there seem to be any mention of anatomy/dissection (tashrih), either approvingly or disapprovingly.

    Those hadith traditions that were concerned solely with medicine, and
    the appropriate procedures allowed by Islamic law, were collected by
    clerics into treatises known as books on prophetic medicine (al-tibb alnabawi). Dissection, either animal or human, is not, however, mentioned in the earliest of these medico-religious tracts, the ninth-century Shiite treatise called The Medicine of the Imams, nor in the numerous
    fourteenth- and fifteenth-century treatises on the subject.



    -

    Attitudes Toward Dissection

    in Medieval Islam

    EMILIE SAVAGE-SMITH 


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    thank you very much, I added your note to the caption


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    “Words are loaded pistols.”

    Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, 1929

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    windypoplarsroom:

    León Bakst

    Design for a Decadent Dress for Mrs. Legar (1910)


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    welovepaintings:

    Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)
    Perseus and Andromeda [detail]
    Oil on panel transferred to ca
    1620-1621
    Hermitage (St Petersburg, Russian Federation)


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    centuriespast:

    L’Assomption de la Vierge peint par Michel Sittow, 
    vers 1500.

    The dogma of the ascension of Mary is in fact an acceptance of matter; indeed it is a sanctification of matter.

    — C.G. Jung


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    wherewasgod:

    peacelovedrama:

    comeseeinsidemybones:

    I’ve read this. :)

    Also read the The Essential Psychedelic Guide. Pretty good and short read.

    i like the illustrations. disclaimer: never actually done lsd

    LSD is beautiful.


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    wherewasgod:

    peacelovedrama:

    comeseeinsidemybones:

    I’ve read this. :)

    Also read the The Essential Psychedelic Guide. Pretty good and short read.

    i like the illustrations. disclaimer: never actually done lsd

    LSD is beautiful.


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    artemisdreaming:

    Lucretia, 1508–12
    Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi) (Italian, Marchigian, 1483–1520)
    Pen and brown ink over black chalk, partially incised with a stylus (recto), rubbed with black chalk for transfer (verso)

    15 5/8 x 11 1/2 in. (39.7 x 29.2 cm)
    Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1997 (1997.153)

    This drawing, produced by Raphael in his early Roman period, reveals his arresting command of antique Roman sculpture and literary sources. According to Ovid’s Fasti and Livy’s History of Rome, the noble matron Lucretia committed suicide after being raped by Sextus, son of the tyrant Tarquin the Proud. Her husband and, later, Junius Brutus avenged her honor by leading a revolt that helped institute the republic as a form of government. Raphael recast the heroic early Roman legend to focus on the rhetorical gesture of Lucretia as a model of sublime virtue, heightening the drama of her death by depicting her about to plunge the dagger into her chest. The sculptural grandeur and monumentality of form speak to Raphael’s encounter with Roman antiquity soon after his arrival in the Eternal City in 1508. The proportions of the idealized figure appear to be those of the canon of antique sculpture, though she is not based directly on a Roman statue. The style and pen-and-ink technique (the outlines are indented with a stylus for transfer) are closely connected to the large-scale preliminary studies for the figures in the Parnassus and School of Athens frescoes in the Stanza della Segnatura at the Vatican. metmuseum




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    artemisdreaming:

    The Parnassus, 1511, Stanza della Segnatura

    Raphael

    This first of the famous “Stanze” or “Raphael Rooms” to be painted, now always known as the Stanza della Segnatura after its use in Vasari’s time, was to make a stunning impact on Roman art, and remains generally regarded as his greatest masterpiece, containing The School of Athens, The Parnassus and the Disputa.

    Raphael was then given further rooms to paint, displacing other artists including Perugino and Signorelli. He completed a sequence of three rooms, each with paintings on each wall and often the ceilings too, increasingly leaving the work of painting from his detailed drawings to the large and skilled workshop team he had acquired, who added a fourth room, probably only including some elements designed by Raphael, after his early death in 1520.

    The death of Julius in 1513 did not interrupt the work at all, as he was succeeded by Raphael’s last Pope, the Medici Pope Leo X, with whom Raphael formed an even closer relationship, and who continued to commission him. Raphael’s friend Cardinal Bibbiena was also one of Leo’s old tutors, and a close friend and advisor.

    Raphael was clearly influenced by Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling in the course of painting the room. Vasari said Bramante let him in secretly, and the scaffolding was taken down in 1511 from the first completed section.

    The reaction of other artists to the daunting force of Michelangelo was the dominating question in Italian art for the following few decades, and Raphael, who had already shown his gift for absorbing influences into his own personal style, rose to the challenge perhaps better than any other artist. One of the first and clearest instances was the portrait in The School of Athens of Michelangelo himself, as Heraclitus, which seems to draw clearly from the Sybils and ignudi of the Sistine ceiling. Other figures in that and later paintings in the room show the same influences, but as still cohesive with a development of Raphael’s own style. Michelangelo accused Raphael of plagiarism and years after Raphael’s death, complained in a letter that “everything he knew about art he got from me”, although other quotations show more generous reactions.

    These very large and complex compositions have been regarded ever since as among the supreme works of the grand manner of the High Renaissance, and the “classic art” of the post-antique West. They give a highly idealised depiction of the forms represented, and the compositions, though very carefully conceived in drawings, achieve “sprezzatura”, a term invented by his friend Castiglione, who defined it as “a certain nonchalance which conceals all artistry and makes whatever one says or does seem uncontrived and effortless …”According to Michael Levey, “Raphael gives his [figures] a superhuman clarity and grace in a universe of Euclidian certainties”. The painting is nearly all of the highest quality in the first two rooms, but the later compositions in the Stanze, especially those involving dramatic action, are not entirely as successful either in conception or their execution by the workshop.  via: francescorizz

    The Vatican “Stanze” via: metabunker


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    artemisdreaming:

    The head of the Muses ” , which is a preparatory sketch for his famous fresco of “Parnassus, Stanza della decorating Senyatura in the Vatican. “Parnassus” - one of four murals, executed by Raphael commissioned Pope Julius II around 1508-1511 years. artinvestment

    Raphael


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    mindsigh:

    George Grosz, “Cain or Hitler in Hell,” 1944


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    i12bent:

    Painter Franz Marc (Feb. 8, 1880 - 1916) was a founder member of Der Blaue Reiter, a German Expressionist group. Marc was killed in the Battle of during WWI….

    “In this time of great struggle for a new art we fight … against an old established power. The battle seems unequal, but spiritual matters are never decided by numbers, only by the power of ideas.” — F.M.


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    wine-loving-vagabond:

    Detail of Bonaparte Crossing the Grand Saint-Bernard Pass, 20 May 1800

    by Jacques-Louis David.


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  • 02/08/11--15:59: reblololo: Mark Rothko


  • reblololo:

    Mark Rothko


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    mediumaevum:

    Lucas Cranach the Elder, German, 1472-1553

    Prince of Saxony, 1517

    (we already saw the princess)


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    indigodreams:

    1000 and One Nights, Anton Pieck


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